On to the plate

Experimenting with flavours, colours and style of food served at our place


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50th Birthday Cake

50_HappyBirthdayHere’s the run down on making Greg’s 50th birthday cake.

Greg’s party was the same day as Jo’s son’s wedding. I had contacted Kathy and asked if she was having a cake for Greg. I was testing the waters to see if she might, and perhaps if she might she might also ask me. I just wanted to be on top of things in the planning department.

When you’re not immersed in making cakes you don’t realise the time that is spent researching design ideas or even the time it takes to convert recipe sizes. Or may it’s just me dithering over ideas, never totally sure of what I’m doing, needing to plan every last detail out and have a few options up my sleeve.

Anyway, the same day I sought Kathy out was the day I learnt when Jo’s son’s wedding was. I now had committed to making two cakes. Although at this stage the wedding cake was just bake and cover. Based on that I got to planning and realised that this was quite do-able. I just hoped I wasn’t going to have to head out of town to any customers the week leading into the events.

50_GeometricKathy and I had a chat and I learnt Greg didn’t like chocolate (secretly dying inside knowing I needed to ganache the cake prior to covering in fondant). But his favourite dessert was Creme Brûlée (which I’ve never had). I suggested the Sour Cream Vanilla Bean cake with a Swiss Meringue Butter Cream with caramel, to try and give some of that some taste of the melted sugar on the top of a Creme Brûlée. Next we got talking about the type of cake. Kathy said a square cake would be less feminine looking (I didn’t actually roll my eyes, but I realised this cake would take a little more loving in making). Finally we discussed colours and design. Kathy said she really didn’t know, but their house was decorated using greys, black and red (good Canterbury colours there – the red and black). I asked if Kathy liked geometric shapes which she did. I was forming a plan in my head as we spoke, which was better than having no clue from the get-go.

A couple of weeks out I got to making the decorations. I used Chocit for the first time at home. I’ve used it during Kevin’s class which he held in November, but I’d not used it since. I can’t speak highly enough of Chocit and the Atlas Mercato pasta roller that Kevin had recommended if someone was in the market to buy one. Gosh it was just so good to use, and the Chocit behaved beautifully. It rolled smoothly and it cut easily. I was feeling pretty chuffed that I was ahead of the game and had the “colour” sorted and would have a fairly simple job of the final decorating of the cake.

Then that coming Tuesday is when Jo asked if it were at all possible that I could make the Frangipani flowers for the wedding cake. It was just as well Greg’s cake was mostly under control (in my mind).

SourCreamVanillaBeanDryIngredientsI was able to finish work early on the Monday of the week of the party and I’d prepared all the ingredients on the Sunday ready for me to make the cake batter. The recipe was for an 8″ round cake that makes 3 layers and I was making a 6 layer 8″ square. I had to convert the tin size and then I had to divide all the quantities by 3. I was going to make two layers at a time an bake them together. The square Magic Line cake pans were ordered from Global Sugar Art in the States but with the lip all around the tin I wasn’t able to fit two tins side by side in the oven.

50_Bake vs FanI put the first of the 3 batches in the oven, each layer on separate racks. However the one on the bottom rack, closest to the oven door baked like a wedge, that is one side was much higher than the opposite side. The height of the shortest sides was too short for my liking. I plodded on and put the next two cake layers in. The tin that baked the “wedge” was not used with the following 2 layers, but even so the same thing happened to the layer that was on the bottom rack. I watched it off and on and I actually swapped it to the top rack just after it had been in the oven for 20 minutes to try and circumvent the lopsided baking. It seemed fine when I swapped the tins over, but when the cakes were done, the one that started on the bottom rack was again a wedge. At least the two wedges would sit nicely one on top of the other (top to top). But there’s no way I could cope with using two layers that were too short. I decided that I had no option than to bake each layer individually. And I would make another two layers to replace the two lopsided ones. I was in for a long night after all. Just as well I managed to finish work early!

Mr Fussy received a SOS call asking him to stop in at the supermarket to get more sour cream, the only ingredient I didn’t have enough of to bake the extra two layers, but I got everything ready and we were right on time with having the batter ready right as I was pulling the 4th layer out (being the second cake I baked as a single layer). I was stunned at the difference it made to bake the cakes as single cakes as opposed to using fan bake to bake multiple layers. The single layers never crusted on the outside edges, and rose significantly higher.

50_Building a towerThat same evening I also ganached the 8″ tier of the wedding cake and I managed to get Greg’s cake into two halves. I piped ganche around the edge of each layer and then filled the layers with Salted Caramel Swiss Meringue Buttercream. At this point it was after 10pm and I got cold feet about putting the two halves together. If things went well I would want to fix it and that could mean an even later night. Instead I covered both halves with layers of gladwrap and put the cakes in the fridge.

SaltedCaramelSauceTuesday I trimmed both halves. At this point I was very grateful I didn’t put the two halves together the previous night. I didn’t have a knife long enough to trim the cake if it had been fully assembled. Now both halves were trimmed I added the poly dowels to the bottom half to support the weight of the top half. I added a 1mm cake card to separate the two halves. This was part of my plan. Knowing Greg didn’t like chocolate, the bottom half of the cake wouldn’t have a layer of ganache on it, and therefore Greg could have a piece of cake free of chocolate. I knew the cake would be cut in half horizontally making it again two halves.

50_The towerI took a deep breath and turned the top half over to sit on the bottom half. I’m not sure what I was expecting, but it was totally fine. Nothing slipped, nothing came away. Since there was no crisis I decided to plod on and I ganached it. Again I had cake cards that weren’t a 100% match for each other. I hate that. Means I have to fluff about so much more trying to get it right, and did I mention it was a square cake. You might think a square cake would be easier but that’s not the case. Square cakes have to be perfect, there’s no hiding a corner that’s slightly off. I didn’t set my expectations too high (haha!) and knew that it would be a softly softly approach to squaring everything up. So Tuesday night was not quite a slap dash. I did try to get things neat and tidy, but I wasn’t aiming for perfection. That would be Wednesday night.

Or Wednesday morning.

I found that if I used my tallest acrylic scraper and held it flush on one side, then add ganache to my other scraper I could then rest the one with ganache against the one flat against the other side and move it up the cake applying a little more ganache where needed and eventually giving a pretty good finish. I had to wait a little bit for the one side of the corner from each 4 sides to set up before I could repeat the process on the other side of the corner. This one was a little more difficult because I was using my left hand to scrape up the side of the cake, which isn’t so easy when it’s not your dominant side. Everything felt odd and it took a lot more concentration. But we got there, and actually it all came together. So the last thing was the top. I had been mulling over how I would ganache the top. I really didn’t feel I could use the upside down method with cake being so tall and heavy. Instead I ganached it up the right way and then put waxed paper over it, then a large acrylic square and applied a little weight and got the spirit level out and tried as best I could to get the top level. Then into the fridge it went. And out the door for a run I was.

50_Bit by bit Ganache

Top left is the first round of ganaching. Top right was applying more ganache to the top to even them up (the top cake board was ever so slightly smaller than the bottom). And the bottom photos show the results of my method for squaring up the corners.

When I got back I took the cake from the fridge and top the acrylic square off along with the waxed paper to see how well the ganaching went. Well not as good as I had hoped. I was in for some patching up. One corner was too low. Sadly I never quite got it right and thought that it would be good enough. It wasn’t. I can clearly see how that one corner isn’t right after applying the fondant. So lesson learned. You really have to get a square cake more right than you might be able to get away with a round cake.

50_Ready to fondantFriday rolled around and while I was completely on track, I knew covering the cake in fondant was going to be tricky work. I had no intention of draping the fondant, I was always going to panel the cake. And for kicks I decided it would be fun to have each side a different shade of grey. Thursday I had coloured the fondant. It actually took quite a bit of work, and even then I wasn’t sure it the change in depth was as noticable as I wanted. It was hot work, working the colour in and I decided it was fine if I alternated a light grey next to a darker grey. So here I was Friday night figuring out how I was going to get what was almost an 8″ square onto the sides of the cake without the fondant shape distorting. And of course I wanted to make sure that it was all the same thickness. As you can see from the photo I measured out my “square”. I used the perfection strips (for rolling cookie dough) to make sure I was rolling an even thickness. And the painters tape was my guide to the square size needed.

50_4 SidesThe first one was for the top of the cake so it was slightly easier but I had to shuffle the rolled out and trimmed fondant onto another cutting mat and then sort of shimmy it off that onto the cake at the very right point. It was now that I could see that corner that wasn’t as perfect as it should have been told the truth. The fondant did stretch a bit as I got it onto the cake so I needed to use a razor to trim the piece again to the right size.

The first piece for the side also didn’t behave as well as I’d have liked. This time the fondant shrunk back a little as I got it to the side. you can see how the piece doesn’t fit as well as it should. I learnt a few things after these two sides, which would have been nice to know right off the bat. Anyway the rest of the sides were mostly fine and fit well with a little bit of trimming. I made not real effort to try and blend the sides. I didn’t want the straight edges to weave which I suspected they would if I tried to rub the edges to blend them a bit more. Next I got the same cutters I used for the Chocit decorations and impressed the fondant making each side different. I had no plan at this point about which decorative pieces would got where, but thankfully on the Saturday morning it worked out and they seemed to fit quite well.

50_ChocitI just had the cake board to cover (which again was a little problematic with the black fondant drying out too quickly and cracking), put the ribbon on and work on the “50” for the top. I’d made cookies using the same geometric shape. I used my Wilton cookie numbers to cut out the cookies. On Saturday I rolled more black fondant (having added some glycerine to help with the drying out), cut out the 5 and the 0, then used the geometric shape to then cut the shape so the number was in the middle and then flipped the fondant piece and placed the cookie over the fondant. I can’t recall what I used to get the fondant to adhere to the cookie. Maybe some piping gel. I had to touch up the fondant piece a bit which I did by using the Color Shapers. Then it was time to let the fondant dry a bit before I piped some melted chocolate onto the back of the cookies and then put cake pop sticks on. This would allow me to put the cookies onto the top of the cake and know they were secure in the cake.

The drive to the party was uneventful, but all the same I asked Mr Fussy to stop part way there so I could check the cake. I was concerned the top half of the cake could possibly budge and try to make a break for it from the lower half of the cake. I know it’s not totally rational, but I’ve never delivered a cake that’s this tall and made in two parts so I needed to give myself some reassurance that all was well. And it was.

CookieTopperOnce we arrived I placed the cookie decorations on the top, took a few quick photos and then the cake was put out the back (away from the sunshine and Greg – who didn’t know Kathy had arranged for a birthday cake) until later in the evening. Cutting the cake was a bit fiddly but we got there. There were numerous treks between the bench I was cutting the cake on, to the sink where I was continually cleaning off the knife. I have a real thing for making sure the knife is clean between cuts. I don’t want to see cake crumbs ending up embedded into the surface of the cake as I make the next cake. It was quite a slow process but in my opinion always worth it.

And there ends my massive tale. It was an absolute pleasure to be able to make Greg’s birthday cake. And I for the most part I enjoyed all the learning experiences I got from making this cake.

50th Birthday Cake

Time for a quick photo and then it was time to get this cake away from the sun. I do like the shadow the cookie decorations created though.


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Waitangi Day – 2015

Waitangi Day Celebration Cake

Waitangi Day Celebration Cake

Haha, I just typed 2014. Boy it’s tough remembering we’re in a new year. Here’s a fun fact (not), I’ve gotten lazy with my writing and seem to always be in a rush. My 5 is verging on an S. I’ve been fully concentrating on making my 5’s more like 5’s. So 2015 is starting to look good 🙂

Seems odd to say “starting”. Here we are, the first day of February. Well January seemed to have flown by. For New Zealand February represents a month where we have a long weekend. Waitangi Day is on Friday. And as has been my custom the last few years, I’ve made a cake in recognition that Waitangi Day is something special to New Zealanders.

It was while we were holidaying in the Sunshine Coast that I began looking for a design that would give a uniquely Kiwi flavour to the design of the cake. I found this image on Flox.co.nz, it was one of several designs being considered for Fly My Pretties tour.

Check out the crack. Thankfully not a game changer to my plans

Check out the crack. Thankfully not a game changer to my plans

I loved the design but wasn’t sure I could pull it off. There’s a lot of detail in that Tui. But I decided to go for it with some minor changes, like excluding all that finer detail in the wings. I added some tylose to fondant and rolled it out and then used the image which I’d printed and then traced the image outline including some of the larger details. I wanted to give the Tui a bit of movement so I used some foam pieces to place under the wings and body and as I did that a crack appeared down the left side of the body. Boo. There was nothing I could do but to wait and see if the gumpaste hardened enough that it held the wing to the body or if it was going to drop off meaning I had to start again. Although I was going to wait 3 days  before gingerly picking up the Tui and seeing if it was in one or two pieces I couldn’t wait that long. I’m so very impatient. The next day (could I have waited less time? I think not!) I picked it up and turned it over and saw the crack was superficial. It hadn’t come through the back at all. Phew, but still annoying.

The colours weren't quite what I hoped. I wanted more depth and some shine.

The colours weren’t quite what I hoped. I wanted more depth and some shine.

Still I had to get up the courage to start painting the Tui. I looked at it each time I passed the dining room table. I kept telling myself I must make a start. But I told myself there was still plenty of time, and I had other things I wanted to finish before I needed to start worrying about the Tui. I did however make a start and at least get the outline painted, and the tail. But the wings. Well I was starting to have a change of mind as to how I would decorate the cake. Initially I planned to have a two tier cake, simply decorated with only the Tui. That meant I’d have to do something about the wings. Gulp. A new plan started to emerge. I would add some colour to the Tui, basically colouring in the wings. Having the outline and a new plan was all I needed to then procrastinate some more. I used the time to toss around ideas about how I would apply colour. Petal dust of painting with watered down food colour. As is typical, I couldn’t decide so made a start on what I thought would be easiest to get together. Hand painting it was. I wasn’t sold on the look so this morning I used petal dusts and some lustre. You see I had this image in mind for the colours and my hand painting wasn’t really up to scratch with dept of colour.

With a bit of time and some petal dust and lustre I finally had the look I had in mind.

With a bit of time and some petal dust and lustre I finally had the look I had in mind.

Ok, so the Tui was pretty much all I had hoped it would be. I still can’t see past the crack, but maybe I’m the only one. So it was onto the cakes.

I had baked Summer Stone’s Sour Cream Vanilla Bean cake (my favourite non-chocolate cake by the way) a few weekends ago and had it in the freezer. I also had a 5″ American Chocolate Mud Cake in my sisters freezer. The mud cake was already ganached and good to go. I ganached the SCVB cake on Saturday. Leah popped over to have a look at how I ganache my cakes. Funnily enough I was almost at a complete blank. It’s been almost 2 months since I last ganached a cake, and there’s been Christmas and holidays and old age that I started out all wrong. But it soon came right and we were able to chat about a few things that have happened over the last 4 years since we worked together.

Miserable little crack that just wouldn't be fixed. I hoped it didn't affect the integrity of the ganache.

Miserable little crack that just wouldn’t be fixed. I hoped it didn’t affect the integrity of the ganache.

When I got up this morning I noticed a hair line crack in the ganache on the 8″ cake. Boo again. I applied a bit more ganache to smooth over it and hoped by the time I got back from the gym it would be all ok and I could get on with covering the cakes in fondant.

I had gone to the gym a bit earlier so I could get home a bit earlier because we were gearing up for a hot day today. I wanted to get the cakes covered before the heat affected the ganache making my life miserable. But it was still too late, even though I was covering the cakes before 10am. As soon as I shifted the 8″ cake the crack came back, but longer than it had been. And while covering the cake wasn’t a problem, I knew the ganache wasn’t as firm as it should be, so there was a look of giving the the beady eye waiting to see if it would bulge. I was really wondering if I’d have the same sort of disaster I did with Jasmine and Sam’s wedding cake.

Going back to my simplistic clean design, well in my rethinking of that I decided that I wanted to repeat the Tui tail around the sides of the 8″ cake. Thankfully I had a larger image of the Tui and I used that as my template to score the pattern around the sides of the cake. I repeated the pattern 4 times, by the 3rd time I used a better tool for pressing into the fondant, and by the forth time it was much easier. I had to go back over the first two patterns to help smooth out the grooves to make it more fluid and less like I’d gouged the fondant (which I was basically).

It was so hot in the house, for the first time ever I had to put the cake into the 3rd bedroom, being on the cooler side of the house, in hopes that it would hold back the bulging, because there were tell talk signs that where the bottom layer was, it was starting to get a nice puffy ring around the cake.

Not everything goes to plan. The joys of cake decorating in Summer. Cracks, thinned fondant and ganache that should never be visible following a layer of fondant.

Not everything goes to plan. The joys of cake decorating in Summer. Cracks, thinned fondant and ganache that should never be visible following a layer of fondant.

Now onto the 5″ cake. This cake was 4.5″ tall so I knew I had my work cut out for me just with the height of the cake vs. the diametre. And the ganache was softer than the 8″ cake. It was suck it and see. And it wasn’t pretty. The fondant tore away at the top on one section and I pushed it back up, but made a bit of a flap where it overlapped now. I’d already decided I was going to texture the side of the 5″ cake. I’d been watching a Craftsy class by Faye Cahill during the week and she was demonstrating this technique so I wanted to give it a go. Plus I needed both of these cakes to stand on their own as well as being cohesive together. The 8″ is going to my work, the 8″ to Mr Fussy’s work. I do like to make things more challenging in the design stakes.

The fondant was a bit of a dogs breakfast but I was making some progress in tidying it up. Well I thought I was until I turned the cake and saw the biggest baddest bulge I’ve ever seen on such a small cake. It was really bad. I pulled the fondant from the side of the cake (this is why I prefer to use Crisco on the ganache in preparation for fondant) to see if I could push that sucker out. It wasn’t having any of it. I wondered if in fact the ganache was bulging because I was putting more pin pricks into the fondant than an acupuncturist would deem necessary to fix a stubborn ache. But I persevered and I won, sort of. The fondant was really thin, and the ganache has snuck out the bottom making it look somewhat untidy, but I wasn’t too concerned. A bit of ribbon would hopefully cover that up. I then textured the side of the cake. It could have worked better. Some of it impressed better than other patches. I was quite thankful that Mr Fussy tends to cut up cake before anyone at his work gets to see what it was to begin with. That took the pressure off trying to make it better. There’s plenty of room for improvement but working against the heat is something I knew I’d not win. So no point getting all in a fluster for.

Two out of four views of the hand painted Tui tail feathers.

Two out of four views of the hand painted Tui tail feathers.

The last little bit was to colour the Tui tail feathers that I’d impressed into the side of the cake. Up close I wasn’t sure if I needed to do anything. I wondered if it was enough to just have the impressions. But when I stood back it wasn’t noticeable. I set about using petal dusts (all edible) to apply colour. I made each of them slightly different. And I tried really hard to add a little colour at a time. Since I’m so patient (not!) I was getting tired of little by little, even though I knew it was the way. It’s hard to do things the way you know is right when you just want to see results immediately. I must have been a very trying child (and adult).

The 8" cake before adding the second tier.

The 8″ cake before adding the second tier.

Having applied the colour I again stood back and realised that it was looking more like seashells than feathers of a bird. Great, I’m going to have to use food colour to outline the feathers to make it look like it’s meant to be something. Instead of black, I used dark brown. I didn’t want such a harsh outline. I started with just the outline and it made a big difference, but it still wasn’t finished enough. I needed to add the details, and when I had, it really made a big difference.

It was finally time to put it all together. I put the ribbon around the top tier which certainly helped to hide the section that had ganache visible. But before I committed to putting the top tier on, I took a few photos. Even though I had tried to wipe the underside of the perspex cake board the 5″ cake was on, I knew it was highly likely that some chocolate would still be there and it would transfer to the bottom tier. I was also a little concerned the Tui wouldn’t hold. But as it turns out everything came together fine. I used two poly dowels to support the top tier and candy melts to attach the Tui to the top tier. Photos taken all I had to do was dismantle it all so that I could separate the cakes for Mr Fussy to take his one to work. I now had to prize the Tui off the top tier. The candy melts had done the job so well it was difficult to remove the Tui. And you don’t get to take something that’s been stuck to the side of the cake off without leaving some carnage. It’s not too bad, but again I’m thankful that no one will likely witness the cake uncut. The Tui wasn’t spared from damage either. Some of the tail has broken off. No tears were shed. I have some photos of what it looked like all complete and I’m pretty happy with the overall look. To anyone else this just represents a slice of cake with coffee at morning tea time. I’m not too precious about the cake.

Quite like this guy. Mr Tui looked good there for the few minutes I took to take photos.

Quite like this guy. Mr Tui looked good there for the few minutes I took to take photos.

So New Zealanders and Kiwis everywhere. Enjoy the long weekend that is ahead if you’re in New Zealand. Happy Waitangi Day (for Friday!).


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A tale of two cakes

Cake Paper Party recipes

Cake Paper Party recipes

The heading of this post is a little melodramatic. Although I did bake two cakes today (Saturday). When I began to follow Summer Stone’s blog, Cake Paper Party, the first post I read was her post on American Mud Cake. The thing is I’d already read it somewhere else and hadn’t realise it was Summer’s recipe. Although I’ve found a Chocolate Mud Cake that works well (Planet Cake) I was intrigued by the American version. Since I didn’t have anything planned for this weekend I decided I’d bake the Mud Cake. I’ll pop it into the freezer and use it later in the month. The other cake I wanted to try was the Sour Cream Vanilla Bean Cake. It’s more or less a from scratch WASC cake. Even though I’ve got a couple of box mixes, and bought the White Chocolate pudding mix while in Canada, I’m still drawn to a from scratch cake. My problem was that Mr Fussy let me know on Friday night, after packing away the groceries, that there was no room in the freezer. He didn’t know what my plans were for the weekend, but the lack of freezer space was going to ruin my plans somewhat since I would have no room in my freezer after the mud cakes went in. The only option was to make the cake and then send him off to work with it on Monday.  I’m working at a client site otherwise I’d take it to work. With two birthdays from work colleagues this weekend it would have been warmly welcomed. Actually a cake at any time would be warmly welcomed.

A rouge block of chocolate has slipped into my "ganache" stash.

A rouge block of chocolate has slipped into my “ganache” stash.

The first cake I started was the Mud Cake. I’d pulled the butter and sour cream out for the Sour Cream Vanilla Bean Cake (SCVBC – just because it’s a lot to write!) before heading out the door for a run, but when I arrived back, had breakfast and showered ready to make a start, I realised I needed more eggs than I had at room temperature, I had enough for the Mud Cake, but not for the SCVBC. So decision made. While I wanted to taste test the Mud Cake, and check the texture, I decided I’d just have to forgo that. As I write I realise that was a bad decision, I really do need to know how that cake baked and tasted. I guess I’ll have to make another!

A little something I collected in Bologna

A little something I collected in Bologna

Can I just say I’m so very very pleased with the Magic Line pans I bought. I watch in wonder as the cakes bake so evenly, and near flat. While I can’t say whether it’s the ML pans or the fact the pans are just 2″ that makes the difference, I know that 2″ pans bake so well and I can’t imagine going back to 3″ high pans, unless of course I want to make a Mud Cake that isn’t expected to be layered.

Flat! I have flat cakes right out of the oven.

Flat! I have flat cakes right out of the oven.

I ran the knife around the edge of the pans carefully so as not to gouge out the side of the cake as I’d done with Mum’s White Mocha birthday cake, another of Summer’s recipes. I tipped the cakes out and then righted them up the other way. I was thrilled with how straight the sides were, and while the cakes look a bit wrinkly on the top (there’s sort of an optical illusion going on in this photo), they have remained flat and not sunk. And they’re 1.5″ tall. That’ll make for a taller cake than I’d usually decorate, it’ll come to 4.5″ tall with frosting to be added. But still, I’d rather than them taller and torted them than worry the cake height wasn’t going to be a bit on the short side.

Hmm, hard to explain what's going on here. I didn't poke my finger in it. I really did bake like this.

Hmm, hard to explain what’s going on here. I didn’t poke my finger in it. It really did bake like this. Ok, so this is not perfectly flat, but it’s the closest I’ve ever had and for that I’m grateful.

We can give the Mud Cake a tick. There’s nothing in making that recipe that worries me and I’m very pleased with how the cakes turned out. Of course I have no idea the taste which is important, and why I’m likely to be making this recipe again in the near future. After lunch I got stuck into the SCVBC. While I outside putting the mud cakes in the freezer I grabbed the other 1/2 recipe I had for the sugar syrup that is used to make the buttercream. I poured that from the zip loc bag to a bowl and then put it in the microwave for 20 seconds. It didn’t really warm at all, but it took the edge off the chill. The butter was at room temperature.

Love me some vanilla beans.

Love me some vanilla beans.

Onto cake number 2. All my ingredients were at room temperature but I still zapped the butter for 20 seconds at two 10 second intervals. The method of making the SCVBC is the reversing method, so there’s no creaming of butter and sugar where you can smoosh the butter well and truly before adding the remaining ingredients. It’s important the butter is quite soft so that it will incorporate without needing the living heck beaten out of it. The extra beating that might be required I suppose could over work the protein in the flour and alter the texture of the cake. At least I’ve heard you can do such things.

Beautiful cake batter.

Beautiful cake batter.

It’s a pretty easy cake to make, in fact I like not having to cream butter and sugar. Once it was ready to go I weighed the batter and then did my sums. While the recipe uses three 9″ cake pans, I wanted to have some of the cake to try but not all of it. I figured out I could use 7″ cake pans (using .77 of the full cake batter) and the remainder would be split across two 4″ cake pans.

Even just nudging above the top of the 2" pan these baby 4" cakes still rose and baked flat. I'm so excited!

Even just nudging above the top of the 2″ pan these baby 4″ cakes still rose and baked flat. I’m so excited!

As it turned out, the batter in the two 4″ cake pans was a little more than 1″ before baking. I had expected the smaller cakes to bake quicker but it turned out that the 7″ and two 4″ cakes took 35 minutes. The other two 7″ cakes took 30 minutes. Go figure. I think the oven temperature had dropped just a bit, clearly enough to make a difference. It wasn’t until I tipped the 7″ cake out onto the cooling rack that I realised I’d not run the knife around the edge. I shook my shoulders and threw caution into the wind and repeated the same with the 4″ cakes. They all just slid nicely out of the pans.

I probably didn't need to add some electric pink to the frosting. Oh well.

I probably didn’t need to add some electric pink to the frosting. Oh well.

The three 7″ cakes are in the fridge and will be filled and covered tomorrow. Not sure how I’ll cover them, but Mr Fussy has requested the Passionfruit flavour for them, and the smaller cake to be strawberry. I’d ordered Nutrafresh freeze dried powder during the week and was eager to try it. I bought Raspberry, Blueberry, Strawberry and Passionfruit. I whipped up the 1/2 portion of Swiss Butter Cream. It takes my KitchenAid a lot longer to emulsify the butter and sugar syrup than Summer describes, but eventually we got there. Again I had my face pressed close watching for that magical moment when everything starts to get all cohesive and I knew it was going to work. I’ll use the same method tomorrow for the passionfruit frosting. Update, well it’s hardly an update when you’re reading this all at once. It’s Sunday and I’ve finished the 7″ cake.  I made the frosting and it took a very long time of nothing much happening. I knew that it wasn’t ruined, I just needed to add a bit more butter. I could see the texture changing very slowly and found that slowing the mixer rather than increasing the speed worked better.  I reckon it took about 15 minutes before I added more butter, and then after that had been worked in I set the timer for 4 minutes. If it hadn’t worked after 4 minutes I was going to add more butter. As if by magic, right on the dot of 4 minutes the buttercream came together. Phew. I did have to add more passionfruit flavouring, so all up 2 tablespoons.

Great texture. These cakes have baked so nicely.

Great texture. These cakes have baked so nicely.

I didn’t need the full batch of buttercream. I knew I wouldn’t. I coloured some of it, but when I was finished and took the cake outside to the fading daylight I could see the buttercream was still too green for what I thought it was inside. I’ve got left over buttercream now in the freezer waiting for another round of cake baking/testing.

Love how the lighting makes this cake look all shiny.

Love how the lighting makes this cake look all shiny.

As for the design of the cake destined for Mr Fussy’s workplace, I had been puddling about with a piece of fondant I’d left out to dry over so I could basically finger paint. Well I wanted a watercolour effect but I have to admit to touching it with my fingers and pushing some of the colour around. I wanted to see how easy this “look” was as I have plans to use it for my Pink Ribbon cake. I first saw this design by Allison Kelleher from  AK Cake Design on The Cake Blog. Anyway adding this to the cake was a bit of a last minute idea. I’d previously cut the fondant strips out and had them measured at 4″ tall.

A small portion of the fondant I painted with edible dusts and rose spirit (not Vodka this time).

A small portion of the fondant I painted with edible dusts and rose spirit (not Vodka this time).

The 7″ cakes I had trimmed to 3cm in height and added minimal frosting between the layers. I really thought the cakes would have been higher than 4″ finished. Sadly I didn’t check before I started to place the fondant panels around the cake. Oh well. It was just some practice and rather than tossing the “art” out I managed to find a way to use it even though it hadn’t been my plan initially.

A little sandwich after dinner. Still a very light but moist cake after a day hanging out in the fridge.

A little sandwich after dinner. Still a very light but moist cake after a day hanging out in the fridge.

As for waste not want not. The left over cake that was torted I sandwiched together and that become pudding. I was pretty pleased with the texture of the cake given it had been in the fridge for a day. Hopefully it’s still just as good tomorrow but I wont know, and Mr Fussy is likely to try palming the cake off without having to have another slice himself. I suspect 3 days in a row might be pushing it. As for me, well I joined the gym today. Last day of sweet treats for me. I’ve got 2kg to lose in 2 months and it’s time to knuckle down and reduce the amount of cake and increase the amount of exercise!

Dessert.

Dessert.